Monthly Archives: May 2014

Where your favorite fast-food chains began

They all started just like any other restaurant: small and driven by someone with a dream. Continue reading

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Headed to Detroit? Hit up these hip suburbs

These thriving suburban Detroit towns provide visitors with a glimpse of the region’s heyday and a sample of what’s to come. Continue reading

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Michael Mina elevates American bar food at Pub 1842

Traveling foodies Captain and Clark showcase Mina’s whimsical but elegant dish twists. Continue reading

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Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso, previously known as Upper Volta, is a landlocked, developing country in the Sahel region of West Africa.  Its capital is Ouagadougou. Burkina Faso is a former French colony; the official language is French.  With a population of approximately 17.8 million, it is one of the world’s least-developed countries, and infrastructure for tourism is limited.  Read the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Burkina Faso for additional information on U.S. – Burkina Faso relations

U.S. citizens are strongly urged to acquire visas for Burkina Faso before traveling to the country.

U.S. citizens traveling to Burkina Faso can apply for a visa by mail, or in person, at the Embassy of Burkina Faso in Washington, D.C., where they will receive a five-year multiple entry visa for USD $140.  If visas are not obtained in advance, the cost at the port of entry is 94,000 francs CFA (approximately USD $190) for a single entry visa with a maximum validity of 3 months, or 122,000 CFA (approximately USD $245) for multiple entry visa with a maximum validity of three months.  Once in Burkina Faso one can apply for a five-year multiple entry visa for 70,000 CFA (approximately USD $140) at the Visa Office of Ouagadougou located at Gounghin.  

Travelers entering Burkina Faso are required to present their current and valid “International Certificate of Vaccination as approved by the World Health Organization (WHO)” (commonly called a “yellow card”) showing that their yellow fever vaccination is up-to-date.

The Embassy of Burkina Faso in Washington is located at 2340 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20008, telephone (202) 332-5577.  Visas are also available from Burkina Faso’s Mission to the United Nations in New York City.  Overseas, inquiries should be made at the nearest Burkinabe embassy or consulate.  Visit the Embassy of Burkina Faso website for the most current visa information, or contact their offices directly.  Several companies that offer visa services, but have no affiliation with the Government of Burkina Faso, have set up sites to resemble that of the Embassy of Burkina Faso.  The correct web address for the Embassy of Burkina Faso in Washington DC is www.burkina-usa.org; the site for Burkina Faso’s Permanent Mission to the UN is www.burkina-onu.org.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Burkina Faso.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page.

U.S. citizens traveling to, and residing in, Burkina Faso are urged to exercise caution and maintain a high level of security awareness at all times.  Violent crimes such as roadside banditry, robbery, and rape sometimes occur in Burkina Faso, especially in remote and border areas.

Roadside banditry is a primary concern for local law enforcement, and a problem that exists country-wide.  Several recent noteworthy events help illustrate the threat.  On October 10, 2013, a U.S. citizen reported that she was a victim or banditry while traveling from Pissila to Kaya.  The vehicle came under fire and the driver pulled over after gunshots struck the windshield.  Two armed bandits ordered the passengers to exit the vehicle and lie on the ground.  The gunmen searched the personal belongings of the passengers and took money and valuables before departing.  On December 27, 2013, a group of armed men attacked a vehicle carrying Burkina Faso’s most famous athlete, soccer star Alain Traoré, on the route between Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso, near Boromo.  On the same day and in the same vicinity, a Swiss government official was shot when the driver of his vehicle refused to stop for armed bandits.  These incidents drew special attention because of their high-profile victims, but they are not unusual in terms of the planning that accompanied them or the outcome.  Bandits often use spotters, for example at highway checkpoints and bus stations, to profile and identify the traveling route of potential victims.  It is also not uncommon for victims to be wounded in a confrontation with bandits, whether or not their assailants make off with electronics or cash.  According to data from the Ministry of Territorial Administration and Security, armed attacks increased significantly in 2012 and 2013.  Highway attacks rose from 104 in 2011 to 375 in 2012, an increase of 260 percent, and then to 509 in 2013, rising another 36 percent.  It should be noted that many incidents go unreported.

The East region, one of thirteen administrative regions, recorded the most armed incidents by far in 2012 and 2013.  The region, which borders Niger, Benin and Togo was the site of more than a third of total attacks in each of those years.  The East region is particularly vulnerable due to its large geographical area and sparse population, and cross-border traffic providing some tempting targets.  In addition, the Sunday cattle market at Fada N’Gourma is one of the largest in the Sahel region and merchants traveling back from the market are a frequent target.  The Center-East, Center-North and Center-West regions, which include highways out of Ouagadougou to other population centers, also saw marked increases in bandit activity in 2012, and these increases were sustained in 2013.  The threat of roadside banditry exists throughout Burkina Faso, and when the police turn their focus to a problematic area the bandits simply move to a new location.

U.S. citizens should exercise caution when traveling along the northern areas of the country near the Mali and Niger borders.  The Sahel Reserve region of Burkina Faso is extremely remote, and the ability of both the Government of Burkina Faso and the Embassy to render assistance in the event of an emergency there is limited.  The U.S. Embassy has placed restrictions on official government travel to Dori, Djibo, the road that connects these cities, and all areas north of that road.  While there have been no known terrorist incidents (bombings, hijackings, or kidnappings) directed against foreigners in Burkina Faso, it is prudent to be aware of these events occurring in neighboring countries and the potential for them to occur region-wide.

Burkina Faso shares a boarder with Mali.  On January 11, 2013 the French military launched operations against terrorist groups that had taken control of northern Mali. Since that time, terrorist groups have stepped up their rhetoric calling for additional attacks or kidnappings against Westerners, particularly against those countries which support international military intervention in Mali.  The al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) terrorist organization and their affiliates could therefore target Westerners in Burkina Faso, especially in the regions of the north near Mali and Niger.

Ouagadougou occasionally experiences demonstrations and civil unrest.  Over the last year the political environment has shifted significantly and there here have been increasing numbers of large-scale protests and defections of ruling party members to the opposition.  On January 18, 2014, more than 100,000 people took to the streets of Ouagadougou, Bobo-Dioulasso, and other cities to protest a proposal by the ruling party to abolish presidential term limits.  Although most demonstrations are generally peaceful, there have been incidents of violence, looting, road blockages, tire burning, and destruction of property.  Instances may arise where the best, safest course of action is to shelter temporarily in place.  U.S. citizens should remain informed of current developments, and avoid crowds, political gatherings, and street demonstrations, even if these appear to be peaceful.

To stay connected:

CRIME: Crime in Burkina Faso poses some measure of risk for visitors.

Recent incidents of violent crime against visitors have included shooting, armed robbery, sexual assault, and rape.  Non-violent crimes directed against visitors have included harassment, theft, burglary, and various confidence scams.  Most reported incidents involve purse-snatchers, pickpockets, and street scam artists who target wallets, jewelry, cell phones, and other valuables.  Passing thieves on motorbikes or in vehicles have stolen bags from pedestrians. If you must carry a bag, consider holding it in your hand rather than strapped over your shoulder, so you will not be seriously injured if someone grabs it forcefully.  Thieves are especially active during international meetings or events which draw large crowds to the capital.  The areas near and around the U.N. Circle, Avenue Kwame N’Krumah, and the Central Market in Ouagadougou experience the highest incidence of street crime targeting foreigners.  Travelers should stay alert, remain in groups, and avoid poorly lit areas.  Be especially cautious at night, when most reported incidents have taken place, but be aware that there have also been incidents in the daytime.  Several attacks have been directed at intercity public buses, and these attacks typically take place during the day.  It is best to check the Embassy website for the latest security information before setting out on your journey.

Perpetrators of business fraud often target foreigners, including U.S. citizens.  Recent scams that have victimized U.S. citizens have taken many forms, including fraudulent transactions for gold and antiquities.  Such fraud schemes are now prevalent throughout West Africa, including Burkina Faso.  The scams pose a danger of both financial loss and physical harm.  A typical indicator of a business scam is the demand for advance payments on contracts.  Persons contemplating business deals in Burkina Faso should contact the commercial section of the U.S. Embassy in Ouagadougou if they have any doubts about the legitimacy of a potential business client or partner.

Normally, fraud schemes begin with an unsolicited communication (usually by e-mail) from an unknown individual who describes a situation that promises quick financial gain, often by assisting in the transfer of a large sum of money or gold dust out of the country.  A series of “advance fees” must then be paid in order to conclude the transaction.  In fact, the final payoff does not exist; the purpose of the scam is simply to collect the advance fees.  Common variations of this scheme involve individuals claiming to be refugees, victims of various African conflicts, or former political leaders in need of help in transferring large sums of money.  Sometimes perpetrators manage to induce victims to provide bank account and credit card information, as well as financial authorizations that allow them to incur large debts against the victim’s credit. In some instances, victims have lost their life savings.

The best way to avoid becoming a victim of advance-fee fraud is common sense.  If a proposition looks too good to be true, it probably is.  Research thoroughly any unsolicited business proposal originating from Burkina Faso or any other source before committing funds, providing goods or services, or undertaking travel.

Do not purchase counterfeit and pirated goods such as CDs, DVDs, or computer software even if they are widely available.  Not only are the bootlegs illegal in the United States, but purchasing them may also be a violation of local law.

VICTIMS OF CRIME: If you or someone you know becomes the victim of a crime abroad, you should contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.  We can:

  • Replace a stolen passport.
  • Help you find appropriate medical care if you are the victim of violent crimes such as assault or rape.
  • Put you in contact with the appropriate police authorities, and if you want us to, contact family members or friends.
  • Help you understand the local criminal justice process and direct you to local attorneys, although it is important to remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.  

The national emergency telephone number is 10-10, which will connect a caller to the Ministry of Security who can then dispatch the appropriate law enforcement or emergency assistance entity. 

Within Ouagadougou, emergency services numbers are as follows:

  • Fire Department:
    • Dial 18 for emergencies. 
    • Dial 50-30-69-47 or 50-30-69-48 for administrative issues.
  • Ambulance Service:
    • Dial 18 for emergencies. 
    • Dial 50-30-66-44 or 50-30-66-45 for administrative issues.
  • Police:
    • Dial 17 for emergencies. 
    • Dial 50-36-44-42 or 50-32-60-69 for administrative issues.
  • Gendarmerie:
    • Dial 16 or 80-00-11-45 for emergencies. 
    • Dial 50-30-32-71 or 50-31-33-40 for administrative issues.

Please see our information for victims of crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While you are traveling in Burkina Faso, you are subject to its laws even if you are a U.S. Citizen.  It is very important to know what is legal and what is not in every place that you visit; foreign laws and legal systems can be vastly different than our own. 

Persons violating Burkina Faso’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Burkina Faso can be severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.  In Burkina Faso, you may be taken in for questioning if you don’t have your passport with you.  In Burkina Faso, it is illegal to take pictures of certain buildings, including government buildings, and it is also illegal to photograph individuals without their permission. If you break local laws in Burkina Faso, your U.S. passport won’t help you avoid arrest or prosecution. 

There are also some things that might be legal in the country you visit, but still illegal in the United States.  You can be prosecuted in the United States for engaging in sexual conduct with children or for using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country regardless of the legality of these activities under that country’s laws.  Counterfeit and pirated goods are illegal in the United States and if you purchase them in a foreign country, you may be breaking local law as well. 

Arrest notifications in host country:While some countries will automatically notify the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate if a U.S. citizen is detained or arrested in that country, others may not.  To ensure that the United States is aware of your circumstances, request that the police and prison officials notify the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate as soon as you are arrested or detained overseas.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Burkina Faso’s customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning export from Burkina Faso of items such as masks, religious materials, and antiquities.  The Director of the National Museum has stated that the export of objects of art (old or traditional artists’ works, and all old material of the national cultural patrimony) is subject to the prior approval of the Ministry of Culture. Contact the Embassy of Burkina Faso in Washington for specific information regarding customs requirements. 

Foreigners should carry photocopies of the biographic page of their passport and their visa with them at all times.  If a passport is lost and a valid visa cannot be presented by the traveler upon departure, a police report documenting the loss of the visa may be required.

Credit cards are accepted at only a few high-end establishments in Ouagadougou. Travelers’ checks may be cashed at local banks, but euro-denominated traveler’s checks are much more widely accepted.  There are a few ATMs in Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso, but they do not always accept cards from foreign banks.  ATMs generally accept Visa and MasterCard credit cards with a personal identification number.

Burkina Faso’s laws concerning photography have changed. Photo permits from the Tourist Office are no longer required for tourists.  Film crews, however, still do require permits. Note that the Tourist Office publishes a list of buildings, installations, and areas that may not be photographed at all.

Local telephone service is adequate but expensive.  Cell phone networks are available in most urban areas, although service can be unreliable.  Telephone coverage in rural areas is limited, though increasing. International calls cannot always be made from hotels; it may be necessary to make international calls from a Post and Telecommunications Office, where only local currency is accepted. Collect calls are not possible.  Cyber-cafes for Internet access are common in both Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso.

If you are a woman traveling abroad, please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

LGBT RIGHTS: The law does not criminalize same-sex sexual activity between consenting adults, but LGBT persons face societal discrimination exacerbated by religious and traditional beliefs against LGBT status. Same-sex civil unions or marriages are not recognized by the government.  Local LGBT organizations have no legal status, and repeated attempts by gay rights groups to register with the government were not approved, despite following correct procedures.  In early 2013, there were public anti-LGBT demonstrations and inflammatory comments made by government officials.  There have been instances of physical abuse of LGBT people that have not been pursued or prosecuted by law enforcement.  For more detailed information about LGBT rights in Burkina Faso, you may review the State Department’s Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2012.  For further information on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) travel, please read our LGBT Travel Information page.

ACCESSIBILITY: While in Burkina Faso, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from in the United StatesThe law prohibits discrimination against persons with physical or mental disabilities in employment, education, access to health care, the provision of other state services, or other areas; however, the government does not effectively enforce these provisions.  Accommodation and accessibility for individuals with disabilities is limited in Burkina Faso.  Access to buildings, pedestrian paths and transportation is extremely difficult for persons with disabilities. Sidewalks (if they exist) are very uneven and rarely have ramps at intersections. Pedestrian crossings are also very infrequent and traffic almost never give pedestrians (disabled or otherwise) the right of way.  Most, but not all, cafés, restaurants, hotels and residential buildings have stairs at the entrance without wheelchair ramps.  Buses and taxis do not have special accommodations for disabled persons.  

Medical facilities and emergency hospital care are very limited and of poor quality, particularly in areas outside of Ouagadougou.  Emergency response services, such as ambulances, are in very short supply, poorly equipped, and in many regions simply nonexistent.

Some medicines are available through local pharmacies, though supplies can be limited and quality is inconsistent.  Travelers requiring specific medicines should bring an adequate supply for the duration of their stay in Burkina Faso.

Prevention of mosquito bites by using topical repellants, long sleeved shirts and long pants, insectside impregnated clothing and bednets is an amportant aspect of preventing malaria, dengue, yellow fever and other mosquito-borne illnesses.

Malaria is a serious risk to travelers in Burkina Faso and can be fatal. Current medications recommended for malaria prophylaxis include Mefloquine (Lariam), Atovaquone/Proguanil (Malarone), and Doxcycline.  Travelers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area, and up to one year after returning home, should seek prompt medical attention and tell the physician their travel history and what anti-malarial drugs they have been taking.  For additional information on malaria, including protective measures, please visit the CDC’s website.

Dengue, another mosquito-borne illness is also present in Burkina Faso.  Prevention of bites is the only protection against dengue, there are no vaccines or treatment currently available.There are vaccines not routinely given in the United States that are strongly advised before traveling to Burkina Faso.  Meningitis and Yellow Fever are endemic in Burkina Faso. Meningitis cases are most frequent during the drier dustier months of January through June.  Travelers should confirm that they have received their quadrivalent meningitis inoculation within the last four years, this is especially important for children.  Travelers over one year of age are required to show proof of yellow-fever inoculation administered at least ten days before arrival in Burkina Faso.

Rabies cases occur throughout Burkina Faso and travelers staying greater than four weeks or with extensive outdoor or animal exposure should consider rabies vaccination prior to arrival.  Always wash dog and bat scratches and bites immediately and then seek medial attention to determine if rabies immunization is recommended.

There is a high a risk of traveler’s diarrhea throughout Burkina Faso; travelers should avoid raw vegetables and fruit that they cannot peel themselves.  Bottled water should be used to diminish risk of diarrhea.

You can find detailed information on vaccinations and other health precautions on the CDC website.  For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization (WHO) website, which contains additional health information for travelers, including detailed country-specific health information

Tuberculosis is an increasingly serious health concern in Burkina Faso.  For further information, please consult the CDC’s information on TB.

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Hotels lull their guests to sleep

Forget the wake-up call. Hotels are now promoting more sleep with new products and programs. Continue reading

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Amazing photos of U.S. landscapes

We asked you to send us your best shots of U.S. landscapes, and thousands of you did. Continue reading

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10 best lighthouses around the USA

For some travelers, the lure of a lighthouse is irresistible. Continue reading

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Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands form an archipelago in the Southwest Pacific Ocean approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Australia. The capital, Honiara, is located on the Island of Guadalcanal. Solomon Islands is a parliamentary democracy within the British Commonwealth. Tourism facilities are limited, particularly outside of Honiara. Read the Department of State Fact Sheet for additional information on U.S. – Solomon Islands relations.

U.S. citizens do not need a visa to enter Solomon Islands for tourism purposes. You must have a passport, an onward/return ticket, and proof of sufficient funds. You may be denied boarding at check-in or turned around upon arrival in Honiara if your documents are not in order. Visitor permits are granted upon arrival at Henderson International Airport in Honiara, and you may enter any number of times as long as your total time in Solomon Islands does not exceed 90 days in a 12-month period. If you arrive on a one-way airline ticket, you must have documentation stating your business; this includes a work permit if you’re going to work in Solomon Islands. The Solomon Islands’ government strictly enforces immigration laws, and you may face fines and other penalties if you remain in the country beyond the authorized period of stay.

If you arrive on a yacht, visit the nearest immigration office to complete arrival forms and apply for a visitor’s permit or e-mail the Immigration Director, Mason Fugui at fuguimason@yahoo.com.au.

If you arrive in Solomon Islands by plane but plan to depart by yacht, you must apply for a visitor’s permit before you arrive by contacting the Director of Immigration. The application should state your arrival date, the vessel name and registration details, the vessel’s arrival date, and the approximate time you will spend in Solomon Islands. It should also request entry on a one-way (arrival only) airline ticket. The Director will issue a permit to be presented at airline check-in. If you do not have this permit, you may be denied boarding. Please allow at least four weeks for the permit to be issued.

For more information about entry requirements, please contact the Permanent Mission of Solomon Islands to the United Nations at 800 Second Avenue, Suite 400L, New York, NY 10017-4709; Tel: (212) 599-6192 or 6193 or visit the Permanent Mission of Solomon Islands to the United Nations website. If you anticipate the possibility of transiting or visiting Australia we advise you to obtain an Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA) for Australia before leaving the United States.

According to the CDC, the government of the Solomon Islands requires proof of yellow fever vaccination only if you are arriving from a country with risk of yellow fever. Please see vaccination recommendations for Solomon Islands from the Center for Disease Control. 

HIV/AIDS Restrictions: Some HIV/AIDS entry restrictions exist for visitors to and foreign residents of Solomon Islands. According to the Solomon Islands Immigration Act, an immigration officer can bar you from entering the country or deport you if you refuse to submit to an examination by a government medical officer after being required to do so.

 Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page.

Acts of political violence and civil unrest sometimes occur in Solomon Islands and may coincide with Parliamentary sessions and court cases. Civil unrest can also occur at sporting or cultural events that attract large crowds, especially if alcohol is involved.

To stay connected:

CRIME: Petty theft is common in some parts of Solomon Islands, so take extra care while walking the streets, going to the market, or going out at night. Guided or group tours are generally safer than traveling alone. Landowners may demand money if you enter their land without permission. Home invasions, burglaries, and violent crime typically increase in the months approaching the Christmas holiday season.

Gang-based criminal activity has increased in and around the Burns Creek area in East Honiara and in the Borderline area, which is close to the Japanese WWII memorial. You should not go alone to the Japanese memorial. Use caution when shopping in the central market area as purse and mobile phone snatching is common. Police have established a post at the Market area where you can report crimes.

There are incidents of yacht-related robberies, usually occurring at night while occupants are asleep.  Most criminals are not deterred even when boats are anchored off-shore.  

VICTIMS OF CRIME: If you or someone you know becomes the victim of a crime abroad, you should contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.  We can:

  • Replace a stolen passport.
  • Help you find appropriate medical care if you are the victim of violent crimes such as assault or rape.
  • Put you in contact with the appropriate police authorities, and if you want us to, contact family members or friends.
  • Help you understand the local criminal justice process and direct you to local attorneys, although it is important to remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.  

The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Solomon Islands is “999”. Other emergency numbers are “911” for Ambulance and Hospital, “955” for National Disaster, and “988” for Fire.

Please see our information for victims of crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:  While you are traveling in the Solomon Islands, you are subject to its laws.  Foreign laws and legal systems can be vastly different from those in the United States.  Persons violating Solomon Island laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  In the Solomon Islands, driving under the influence could land you immediately in jail.  If you break local laws in the Solomon Islands, your U.S. passport won’t help you avoid arrest or prosecution.

There are also some things that might be legal in the country you visit, but still illegal in the United States.  You can be prosecuted in the United States for engaging in sexual conduct with children or for using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country regardless of the legality of these activities under that country’s laws.  Counterfeit and pirated goods are illegal in the United States and if you purchase them in a foreign country, you may be breaking local law as well. 

Arrest notifications in host countryWhile some countries will automatically notify the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate if a U.S. citizen is detained or arrested in that country, others may not.  To ensure that the United States is aware of your circumstances, request that the police and prison officials notify the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate as soon as you are arrested or detained overseas.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES

CUSTOMS INFORMATION: The Solomon Islands’ customs authorities enforce strict regulations for importing or exporting firearms and ammunition, sexually explicit material, and certain prescription drugs to or from Solomon Islands. Other items may be subject to quarantine regulations or import duty. The Solomon Islands’ government prohibits the export of military artifacts from World War II. Contact the Solomon Islands’ Mission to the United Nations for specific information regarding customs requirements.

NATURAL DISASTERS: Solomon Islands lie in the South Pacific cyclonic trajectory and are vulnerable to earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and sudden tidal movements. The Pacific cyclone season extends from November through March. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

If you are a woman traveling abroad, please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

LGBT RIGHTS:  While same-sex sexual relations are criminalized in Solomon Islands, there are no known incidents of the prosecution, targeting, or harassment of consenting same-sex adults. We recommend that you avoid public displays of affection, which could be categorized by the Solomon Islands penal code as an act of gross indecency, a felony, liable to imprisonment for five years.  For more detailed information about LGBT rights in the Solomon Islands you may review the State Department’s annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.  For further information on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) travel, please read our LGBT Travel Information page.

ACCESSIBILITY: While in the Solomon Islands, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from in the United States. There is no law or national policy on persons with physical, sensory, intellectual, or mental disabilities, and no legislation mandates access to buildings for such individuals. In practice, very few buildings are accessible to persons with disabilities.

The road network in Solomon Islands is in poor condition, and foot paths and road crossings in most major towns are congested. Open drainage systems in downtown Honiara limit access and movement for people with disabilities.

Hospitals and pharmacies in Solomon Islands are limited to populated areas and religious missions. The nearest reliable medical facilities are in Australia or New Zealand. There is only one hyperbaric recompression chamber in Honiara; it is at the In-the-Zone Medical Centre, phone (677) 23485 or (677) 23482. Medical conditions resulting from diving accidents may require medical evacuation to Australia or New Zealand. Serious medical treatment requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to Australia, New Zealand, or the United States can cost thousands of dollars. Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for health services. If you anticipate the possible need for medical treatment in Australia, obtain entry permission for Australia in advance.

Malaria occurs throughout the year in most areas of Solomon Islands. Seek medical advice on taking prophylaxis against malaria and use an insect repellent at all times. Outbreaks of the mosquito-borne illness, dengue fever, occur from time to time. For information on dengue fever, see the World Health Organization Factsheet. Water-borne, food-borne, parasitic, and other infectious diseases (including hepatitis, tuberculosis, filariasis and sexually transmitted infections) are prevalent, with more serious outbreaks occurring from time to time. We encourage you to consider having vaccinations before travelling. We advise you to boil all drinking water or drink bottled water, and avoid ice cubes and raw and undercooked food. Seek medical advice if you have a fever or are suffering from diarrhea.

You can find detailed information on vaccinations and other health precautions on the CDC website.  For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization (WHO) website, which contains additional health information for travelers, including detailed country-specific health information

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Americans spending more on summer travel

Costs are up, but travelers also are splurging more on amenities. Continue reading

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At Portland Lobster Company, catch and eat your own

The restaurant has a partnership with a lobstering tour boat moored right next door. Continue reading

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